Coronavirus: Anxiety rises as Chinese city goes into lockdown


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Media captionThe BBC’s online health editor talks us through what we know about the virus
A sense of anxiety is growing in Wuhan as the Chinese city goes into lockdown in an effort to control the spread of a deadly virus which has left 17 dead.The authorities have suspended outbound planes and trains into the city, as well as buses, subways and ferries.Residents have been told not to leave the city of 11 million people. Voicing fear about food shortages, one said it felt like “the end of the world”. There are more than 500 confirmed cases of the virus which has spread overseas. Officials in Hong Kong reported the territory’s first two cases of the coronavirus on Wednesday and one case was reported in the nearby city of Macau.The first US case was confirmed on Tuesday.
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The lockdown in Wuhan comes as millions of Chinese people in other parts of China are travelling across the country for the upcoming Lunar New Year holiday.Another Wuhan resident said on social media site Weibo that they were on the “verge of tears” when they heard about the closures. All outbound flights from Wuhan have been suspended as of Thursday. A handful of inbound flights still appear to be operating, though many flights have been cancelled. Singapore Airlines, budget carrier Scoot, which operates a daily flight between Singapore and Wuhan, have on Thursday cancelled flights on that route.

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All train services out of Wuhan have been suspended

On Thursday, China’s National Health Commission released details of the 17 victims. The youngest victim was 48 and the oldest was 89. Most of them were elderly and suffered from other chronic diseases including Parkinson’s disease and diabetes. All the fatalities so far have been in Hubei, the province around Wuhan.Meanwhile, after a day of discussions in Geneva, the World Health Organization’s (WHO) emergency committee has announced it will not yet declare a “global emergency” over the new virus.Director general Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus said more information was needed about the spread of the infection. The committee of health experts will meet again on Thursday.A global emergency is the highest level of alarm the WHO can sound and has previously been used in response to swine flu, Zika virus and Ebola.



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News Daily: Baby deaths investigation and Chinese virus latest



If you want to get this briefing by email, sign up hereHospital baby deaths ‘could have been prevented’In the space of three years, at least seven babies being cared for by the same NHS trust may have died in preventable circumstances, a BBC investigation reveals. Among them was Dawn Powell’s son, Archie. He suffered severe brain damage after staff failed to spot an infection and died, aged four days, last February. “We’ve just got this void in our lives where he should be,” she says. Archie’s death came just weeks after Tallulah-Rai Edwards was stillborn. Two days earlier, midwives had sent her mother home despite struggling to get a good heart-rate reading. Tallulah-Rai’s father, Nick, says: “We have to live with it for the rest of our lives. They’ve probably forgotten who we are now.”East Kent NHS Foundation Trust admits it has “not always provided the right standard of care for every woman and baby in our hospitals”. In a statement, it does not address individual cases raised by the BBC, but it says: “We express our heartfelt condolences to every family that has lost a loved one and we wholeheartedly apologise to families for whom we could have done things differently.”

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Flights out of Wuhan were suspended after these passengers touched down in Sydney, Australia

Virus prompts public transport shutdownThe Chinese city of Wuhan is shutting down public transport amid heightened concerns over the deadly virus that has infected more than 500 people, killing 17. With millions of Chinese on the move ahead of the lunar new year, officials are advising people to stay at home. Flights and trains out of the city have been cancelled, while buses, ferries and the subway have stopped operating. The move is being likened to “shutting down London in the week before Christmas”, and it remains to be seen how many people will choose to drive out of town. The virus has already spread to other parts of China, while cases have been reported in the US, Thailand, South Korea, Japan and Taiwan.

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UK has ‘crossed Brexit finish line’The UK can put “years of rancour and division behind it” after Parliament passed legislation implementing the Brexit deal, according to Boris Johnson. With the EU bill awaiting royal assent, the prime minister says the country has “crossed the Brexit finish line”. The EU’s top officials are expected to sign the agreement in the coming days, with MEPs voting on it next week. From 1 February, the UK will enter into an 11-month transition period, continuing to follow EU rules but without representation in the bloc’s institutions, to allow negotiations over trade and security.How do you sell Tyson Fury? Next stop, USABy Mike Henson, BBC SportHe may lack the showreel of brutal knockouts boasted by famous namesake Mike. He might not be a clean-cut, on-message corporate dream, like heavyweight rival Anthony Joshua. And he is not a Ricky Hatton-style figurehead who commands a whole city of loyal fans, either.Tyson Fury, 31, has made his own success story. The self-styled “Gypsy King” from the Traveller community has defied logic, won over the public and come up smiling as boxing’s clown prince, now preparing for another big fight in the US – a rematch with Deontay Wilder on 22 February. So how has he done it? And what can Las Vegas expect next? Read the full articleWhat the papers say

Some front pages focus on the threat from the virus that has infected more than 500 people in Wuhan, China, killing at least 17 of them. According to the Metro, it is “on the way here”, while the Sun declares “World War Flu”. The Financial Times report tensions between London and Washington, amid a “war of words over trade and tariffs”. The Times predicts clashes “on three fronts” as the US opposes the British stance on taxing large tech companies, Chinese company Huawei’s potential involvement in the UK’s 5G network and Iran’s nuclear ambitions.Daily digestBereavement leave Two weeks off for grieving parentsAustralia Three dead as firefighting plane crashesTrump Democrats reject witness swap in impeachment trialJean-Paul Gaultier Stars turn out for designer’s final showIf you watch one thing today

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Lookahead15:00 Falklands veteran Joe Ousalice, who was forced out of the Royal Navy because of his sexuality, will be re-awarded his Long Service and Good Conduct medal at a ceremony at HMS Excellent, in Portsmouth.18:00 Jonathan Hall QC, the independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, gives his first major speech since the London Bridge terrorist attack.On this day1973 The US and Vietnam announce a peace deal to end more than a decade of conflict. Watch how Newsround reported the effects on children.From elsewhereA very naughty boy: Remembering Monty Python’s Terry Jones (NPR)The battle for the Vatican (Politico)Fact/Fiction: Does going to the cinema count as a light workout? (Big Issue)From flirting to philandering – the truth about the sex lives of the French (Telegraph)



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Australia fires: Canberra Airport shut down as blazes intensify


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Canberra Airport has been closed due to approaching bushfires

The airport in Australia’s capital city, Canberra, has been shut down as bushfires threaten the region.Flights were cancelled out of Canberra Airport, a 20 minute drive from the city centre, as blazes raged nearby. A heatwave sweeping the nation’s south-east caused existing blazes to flare up again on Thursday, officials said.Meanwhile there are reports a firefighting aircraft may have crashed in the Snowy Mountains, two hours south of the capital.The New South Wales (NSW) Rural Fire Service said it had lost contact with the large air tanker shortly after 13:30 local time (02:30 GMT) on Thursday. Helicopters are searching the area and emergency services have rushed to the scene.
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There are more than 80 blazes raging across the state of NSW as hot and windy conditions return to the region. In Canberra, officials issued emergency warnings urging people to stay away from the airport as two blazes threatened to breach the airfield’s perimeters.

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Smoke from the fires shrouds Parliament House

Authorities said the blazes threatening Canberra Airport had escalated after first appearing on Wednesday. The capital, located in an administrative region between Sydney and Melbourne, has had large fires raging on its outskirts for weeks. The city suffered the worst air quality in the world for several days earlier this year because of bushfire smoke.Fire threat returnsSince September, Australia has battled an bushfire crisis which has killed at least 30 people.More than 10 million hectares – an area almost the size of England – have been destroyed in blazes. The most affected states are NSW and Victoria.Recent days of thunderstorms and rain across fire grounds had helped halve the number of blazes burning in the region since the start of the year.Fires ‘far from over’ as storms sweep AustraliaHowever, fire chiefs warned that the sporadic rain would only provide short-term relief ahead of the return of dangerous conditions.Temperatures in Sydney on Thursday soared past 40C (104F) in the city’s west.”We’ve got thousands of kilometres of fire perimeter,” NSW Rural Fire Services Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons told reporters on Thursday.”All of the fires that we’ve still got, whether they’re under control or are still being worked on, are going to be tested today.”By midday on Thursday, more than half a dozen blazes were burning at “emergency level” on the south coast.

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Media captionSevere thunderstorms and hail caused havoc in Canberra and Melbourne earlier this week



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Harry and Meghan: How much privacy can they expect in Canada?


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Meghan returned to Canada last week

Within hours of Prince Harry arriving in Canada to join his wife for the start of a new life away from royal duties, the couple issued a legal warning about media intrusion.Pictures of Meghan walking her dogs while carrying her son Archie in a baby sling were published in newspapers and on websites. Lawyers said they were taken without her consent, by photographers hiding in bushes. The couple say they want a different relationship with the media now they’ve stepped back from their life as senior royals. But have the rules changed? And what can they expect now that they’ve left the UK?How much privacy can the couple expect?Not much, according to Ingrid Seward, a royal biographer and editor of Majesty Magazine. She says she’s surprised the couple weren’t expecting the paparazzi to follow them to Canada. “Of course the safest place for Harry and Meghan to be is in the UK,” she told told Radio 4’s PM programme. “They haven’t been papped once since their marriage, and if they have been, no pictures have been printed. “Those rules don’t apply in Canada. The paps can come from all over the world and lie in wait for them.”
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The couple are believed to be alarmed by press activity near their current base on Vancouver Island, British Columbia.Their lawyers say there have been attempts to photograph inside their home using long-range lenses and they accuse the paparazzi of being camped outside the property.PR and media expert Rebecca May says that without the long-standing “gentleman’s” agreement between the Palace and the UK media to avoid using paparazzi photos, Harry and Meghan “will have to navigate their way through this new world without that protection”.

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The press have descended on Vancouver Island, near where the couple are believed to be staying

The CHEK news service, based in Vancouver Island, was one of the outlets which decided not to use the photo – taken in Horth Hill Regional Park – that prompted the legal warning.Its news editor, Scott Fee, says he spoke to the photographer responsible who defended it, saying it was taken on public property.He told BBC Breakfast: “That’s [the photographer’s] version. He said Meghan didn’t hide from the shot, she gave me a smile, she didn’t prevent it from happening – those are his words. If that’s how it played out – it’s hard to say.”Mr Fee says his publication chose not to use the pictures, which appeared on the front page of the Sun, because they had to listen to their audience, who tend to be really protective of the couple. He adds: “We do want to respect what the couple are saying as well. We’re not looking to be intrusive, we’re not looking to stalk the couple.”However, he does acknowledge that his organisation will be closely following the story as it “unfolds in our own backyard”.What’s the couple’s relationship with the media?Prince Harry has long had an uneasy relationship with the media, having grown up aware of the impact the intense media interest had on the life of his mother, Diana, Princess of Wales.She died in a car crash in Paris in 1997 while being pursued by paparazzi on motorbikes.The prince has often compared his wife’s experiences of the press with those of his late mother.In 2016, Prince Harry attacked the media for subjecting Meghan – then his girlfriend – to a “wave of abuse and harassment”.
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Last year, Harry accepted damages and an apology from a news agency which used a helicopter to take photographs of the inside of his home in the Cotswolds.The duchess is currently suing the Mail on Sunday over publishing one of her private letters to her father, Thomas Markle, accusing the paper of misusing her private information, breaching copyright and selective editing.

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Meghan has had close ties to Canada for many years, although she is an American citizen by birth

Days after confirming his wife’s legal case, the duke announced he would take legal action against the owners of the Sun, the defunct News of the World, and the Daily Mirror, in relation to alleged phone-hacking.In his statement last October, the prince singled out Britain’s tabloid newspapers, saying that they had ruined his mother’s life and he wouldn’t let them ruin his wife’s.BBC media editor Amol Rajan says the way to stay out of the media is not to be too interesting, adding that recent events have, ironically, seen interest in the Sussexes “radically increase”.He says: “If you want to stay out of the media, it’s not about where you are, it’s about who you are and what you do.”There is something desperately sad for the couple in the fact that, even in North America, you cannot get away from scrutiny – given that every passer-by has a smartphone.”Don’t the couple need publicity for their careers?Under their new arrangement with the royal family, Harry and Meghan will stop receiving public funds for royal duties.However, the couple will continue to maintain their private patronages and associations, while they have previously said they plan to launch a new “charitable entity”.PR and media expert Rebecca May says it is crucial that the couple’s advisers “guide them through this new maze and keep Canada’s press on side to help with this transition period”.
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She says: “After all, to raise awareness for their charities and causes they need the media to spread the word. Therefore the key is to set boundaries and stick to them. “Be up front and open with the press and they will be respectful if they know what rules you play by.”

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The Duchess of Sussex visited a women’s centre in Vancouver last week

She anticipates “a bumpy ride” for at least the next 12 months for the couple, adding that it will also very much depend on their next career moves.”Inevitably, I don’t see their move to Canada helping them stay out of the media spotlight in the short to medium term, however, in the long term it could be a good move for them.”Newspapers have claimed that Harry appeared to tout Meghan for voiceover work with Disney at the Lion King premiere in July. The couple have previously looked to capitalise on the Sussex Royal brand – lodging an application to trademark the name in June last year, covering items such as books, calendars, clothing, charitable fundraising and campaigning.It raised the possibility of Prince Harry and Meghan launching their own lines of products, from beauty to clothing – however the agreement with the Queen has cast doubt on that idea. A brand incorporating the word “royal” may not be compatible with their agreement to step back from royal duties.How does the law in the UK compare to Canada?In the UK, you can generally take pictures of people in public spaces without permission. But there could be circumstances where it is not allowed, for example if the person was in an area where they reasonably expected privacy or your actions amounted to harassment.Canadian privacy laws are similar to those in the UK, but there are also provincial statutes in Canada.In the province of British Columbia, where Prince Harry and Meghan are staying, a separate Privacy Act is in force. In a public place, there may be a limited expectation of privacy under certain circumstances.

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Scores of photographers followed Meghan at official events in the UK

Canadian media lawyer Dan Burnett has worked on a number of privacy cases in the province and says the key question for the courts is whether there is “a reasonable expectation of privacy”.He says: “Factors such as children and surreptitious photography would be important considerations supporting the potential claim in Meghan’s case.”The fact it was in a public place would lean the other way, but if the photographers were hiding, that suggests they knew she considered it a safe, private space at the time.”However, there is still a public interest exemption in Canada which could be used by journalists and photographers in some cases. A court considering a case would also have to take freedom of the press into account.The privacy laws in Canada haven’t been as stringently tested as in the UK – with there being less of a paparazzi culture – so it is unclear what scenarios would amount to an invasion of privacy.In the UK, privacy rights began to change with the passage of the Human Rights Act in 1998, which introduced a right to “respect for private and family life”.The result has been a series of rulings against the media, such as Max Mosley who successfully sued the News of the World for breach of privacy, after it had published pictures of him with five sex workers.Sir Cliff Richard used the same privacy law in 2018 to win his case against the BBC, which had showed helicopter footage of a police raid on his home.What is the global interest in royal pictures?Rebecca May says Prince Harry and Meghan’s move to Canada is drawing press attention from “all across the globe” and exclusive paparazzi photos could be “worth hundreds of thousands of pounds”.She says: “There are extreme lengths photographers may go to to get ‘the photo’. You can expect bidding wars for exclusive images.”Press intrusion is not a new problem for the royals, as Meghan’s sister-in-law, the Duchess of Cambridge, would testify.In 2017, Catherine was awarded £92,000 in damages after a French magazine printed topless pictures of her in 2012.At the time of the judgement, BBC Paris correspondent Hugh Schofield said the guilty verdict was not a surprise, adding “it’s almost a game these magazine play”.He said: “They get the fines but they think it’s worth it – they get the extra sales from the photographs they publish.”

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The paparazzi were accused of harassing two-year-old Prince George in 2015

And the paparazzi have also targeted the royals’ children, In 2015, Kensington Palace issued an appeal to world media not to publish unauthorised images of two-year-old Prince George.The palace said some paparazzi had gone to “extreme lengths” to take pictures and “a line has been crossed”.A small number of media organisations, mostly in Germany, France, Australia, New Zealand and the US, had published photos of Prince George in “unacceptable circumstances”, it said.However the palace said the “vast majority” – and all UK publications – had refused.



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Problem gambling: Why do some people become addicted?


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Taking risks is a fundamental part of human nature.Whether it is gambling on a slot machine or riding a skateboard, every day we choose to engage in activities which offer both a potential risk and a potential reward. We are motivated to take these risks by the release of dopamine. This feel-good chemical activates the same pleasurable reward pathways in our brains as eating our favourite food, or having sex.Risk-taking can help to advance the human race when it leads to entrepreneurship, innovation and enhanced creativity. But problems can arise when an increased desire to take risks causes harm.This includes problem gambling, which is estimated to affect as many as 1% of the population. Recent attempts to tackle the issue include plans to ban internet betting with credit cards and making treatment more widely available.When does gambling become a problem? Extreme gambling is recognised as a disorder by the World Health Organization. Most people can enjoy placing an occasional bet, even if it means they lose some money. But some become problem gamblers, where the activity disrupts or compromises their lives and those of their families. In 2016, the Gambling Commission estimated there were up to 340,000 problem gamblers in the UK, with many more individuals at risk. Their report suggested problem gamblers were:
Five times more likely to be male than female
More likely to be unemployed than in work, studying or retired
Most likely to be aged 25 to 34 (if male)
More likely to be from a black or other minority ethnic background than from a white or Asian background (on a three-year view)
More likely to indicate signs of mental ill health
More likely to indicate signs of low wellbeing
In the year to March 2019, UK gamblers collectively lost about £14.4bn. Signs that somebody may have a problem include feelings of anxiety or stress around their gambling habit, betting more than they can afford to lose, and gambling ever larger amounts of money to feel the same “high” as before.The number of gambling-related hospital admissions in England has more than doubled in the last six years to a record high. This includes people whose gambling could lead them to carry out crimes, and cases of psychosis.There are now plans to open 14 more problem gambling clinics by 2023-24.

GETTYGambling in numbers£14.4bnwas collectively lost by UK gamblers in year to March 2019£2maximum bet on fixed odds betting terminals, cut from £100340,000people are thought to be problem gamblers in the UK 114%rise in gambling-related hospital cases in six years Source: Gambling Commission, BBC, NHS England
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Why do some people have a problem?Gambling, alongside the use of substances like drugs and alcohol and even activities like shopping, can become an addiction when its use becomes compulsive and spirals out of control.These addictions stem from two separate reward pathways in the brain that affect our behaviour – liking and wanting.Liking describes the spontaneous delight of eating a chocolate biscuit. Wanting is our desire to have one when we see a packet of chocolate biscuits in the supermarket. Wanting something motivates us – it makes us desire things and do them repeatedly. In essence, addiction can be simply viewed as rewiring of these reward systems.

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Compulsive gambling and other addictions can be viewed as a rewiring of the brain’s reward systems

When people become addicted to gambling, or to drugs, these wanting and liking systems are no longer intertwined. The wanting remains constant, but the feeling of liking what we get is reduced. The addicted person needs to engage in more of the behaviour or the drug to get the same pleasure. Certain factors leave some people at greater risk of addiction. This can include having family members with addictions, or encountering high-level stress or adversity – experiences which relate to the way we are nurtured.Nature can also play a part. A study using brain scans suggests problem gamblers may have lower impulse-control than the general population.

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Gambling 24/7Some steps have been taken to reduce the problems gambling can cause. In recent years, campaigns have focused on fixed odds betting terminals, with the maximum stake cut from £100 to £2. These machines have been described as the “crack cocaine of gambling” and had made it easy for users to lose a lot of money quickly.The focus is now shifting to online and mobile gambling, which allows people to gamble 24 hours a day – often with the possibility of setting up automatic bets.Extensive promotion of gambling on apps and betting websites includes sponsorship deals with famous sports players and teams supported by millions of people.

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Several sports teams are sponsored by gambling firms

Mobile gambling means individuals can easily lose large sums of money. There is also the risk of children using stolen details to gamble online, with one study suggesting two-fifths of 11-16 year-olds have gambled in the past year.There have also been claims that online data profiling is being used to target poorer people, who tend to spend a higher proportion of their income on gambling. One way to reduce the risks could be for problem gamblers to be recognised by the same algorithms used to offer rewards on gaming websites. Instead, they could be offered targeted support, and potentially have their access to these sites restricted.There are growing calls for gambling to be reframed as a public health issue, like smoking and physical inactivity, which also disproportionately affect poorer people.National campaigns about the dangers of gambling, similar to those used to combat obesity and smoking, could be launched, and the issue highlighted by health professionals, debt advisers and within the school curriculum.In the future, we may have to ask ourselves as a society whether the benefits of promoting gambling outweigh the harms.About this pieceThis analysis piece was commissioned by the BBC from experts working for an outside organisation. Dr Ricardo Twumasi is a lecturer in Organisational Psychiatry & Psychology at King’s College London. You can follow him on Twitter here.Prof Sukhi Shergill is a professor in Psychiatry and Systems Neuroscience at King’s College London. Edited by Eleanor Lawrie



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Impeachment: Democrats reject witness swap in Trump trial


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Media captionSchiff: ‘The facts are damning’
US Democrats have ruled out a “witness swap” with Republicans in President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial.Lawmakers who are seeking to remove the president from office hope to hear testimony from his former National Security Adviser John Bolton.But Democrats refused any deal to allow the son of former US Vice-President Joe Biden to be called as a witness.The trial could end next week, but Mr Trump’s fellow Republicans control the Senate and are unlikely to oust him.Attending the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, on Wednesday, Mr Trump jokingly warned he might confront Democrats by coming to “sit right in the front row and stare at their corrupt faces”.Mr Trump is accused of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.
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He denies using US military aid as a bargaining chip in an attempt to prod Ukraine into announcing an investigation to discredit his would-be Democratic White House challenger, Mr Biden.Mr Trump has been touting corruption claims against Mr Biden, whose son Hunter held a lucrative board position with a Ukrainian gas firm while his father was US vice-president and in charge of American-Ukrainian relations.

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Media captionTrump impeachment: What happened on day one?
What is the witness swap proposal?Democrats want to call Mr Bolton, who referred to the White House’s alleged political pressure on Ukraine as a “drug deal”, according to previous witness testimony in the House of Representatives.But the former national security adviser has said he will not consider testifying unless served with a legal summons known as a subpoena.Mr Trump’s Republican allies have argued Hunter Biden should also be ordered to appear before the impeachment trial.But Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the top Democrat in the Senate, told reporters during a break in the trial on Wednesday: “That trade is not on the table.”

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Media captionTrump impeachment trial: Five possible twists ahead
“This isn’t like some fantasy football trade,” he told reporters. “Trials aren’t trades for witnesses.”Joe Biden said on Wednesday in Osage, Iowa, where he is campaigning for the White House that he would not offer himself up in any witness trade.”We’re not going to turn it into a farce or political theatre,” Mr Biden said. “I want no part of that.”Defending his son, Mr Biden added: “There’s no body that’s indicated there’s a single solitary thing he did that was inappropriate or wrong – other than the appearance. It looked bad that he was there.”Mr Biden said last year that if elected president, no-one in his family would hold a job or have a business relationship with a foreign corporation.
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Media captionA beginner’s guide to impeachment and Trump
What’s happening in the trial?House Democrats have up to three days to make their case as they present their arguments in the Trump impeachment trial in the Senate.Mr Trump’s defence team will have three days after that for a rebuttal.On Wednesday, the lead Democratic prosecutor, California congressman Adam Schiff, urged Republicans to vote to remove Mr Trump from office to “protect our democracy”.Mr Schiff, who is chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, warned that senators would “also undermine our global standing” if they do not oust the president.

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Media captionWhat’s Ukraine got to do with the Trump impeachment?
The first day of the trial dragged on till the early hours of Wednesday morning as the senators debated a flurry of incremental motions.Much of the evidence being laid out is a rehash of testimony already presented exhaustively in the House of Representatives, which voted to impeach Mr Trump last month.Under arcane rules, senators are forbidden to drink coffee on the chamber floor and are only allowed water and milk.Several members of the chamber have been spotted dozing during the proceedings.

What questions do you have about Donald Trump’s impeachment trial?In some cases your question will be published, displaying your name, age and location as you provide it, unless you state otherwise. Your contact details will never be published. Please ensure you have read our terms & conditions and privacy policy.Use this form to ask your question:

If you are reading this page and can’t see the form you will need to visit the mobile version of the BBC website to submit your question or send them via email to YourQuestions@bbc.co.uk. Please include your name, age and location with any question you send in.



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Yad Vashem: Why Poland won't be attending Holocaust memorial



Poland’s President Andrzej Duda has snubbed an event at Israel’s Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial to mark the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.Mr Duda complained that he has not been allowed to address the audience, whereas Mr Putin and other leaders will speak.Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki told the BBC’s Mishal Husain that the decision was a “disrespect to Poland”.The row is the latest escalation a bitter dispute between Russia and Poland over the history of World War Two.



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US plans limits for 'emotional support' animals on flights


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An emotional support peacock was turned away from Newark airport in 2018

The US is seeking to limit the kinds of animals that airlines must allow on board for free.The Department of Transportation has proposed to restrict that right to dogs that are trained to help people with disabilities.It said the plan is a response to concerns that increasing passengers are falsely claiming pets as “service animals”.The proposal is subject to public comment before it goes into effect.Among other changes, the proposal would mean that so-called emotional support animals are no longer entitled to the same rights as “service animals”.While passengers could have psychiatric service animals, that classification would require animals to have training.’Comfort turkeys’US airlines welcomed the plans. They had called for action, saying a rising number of animals travelling in aeroplane cabins has led to growing complaints and incidents such as biting.”Airlines want all passengers and crew to have a safe and comfortable flying experience, and we are confident the proposed rule will go a long way in ensuring a safer and healthier experience for everyone,” said Nicholas Calio, president of industry lobby Airlines for America.The changes, if they move forward, would bring the US closer to the UK, which does not recognise “emotional support” animals.In the US, passengers attempting to bring turkeys, peacocks and squirrels inside plane cabins in recent years have drawn attention to the issue and prompted some airlines to tighten their rules on their own.American Airlines, for example, prohibited flying with frogs, ferrets, hedgehogs and goats, even if they are therapy animals.Delta noted in 2018 that some passengers “attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums known as sugar gliders, snakes” and spiders.The Department of Transportation proposal would allow airlines to limit the number of animals passengers may bring with them, impose size rules and require paperwork certifying their service animals.However, airlines would not be allowed to refuse transport to service animals based on breed.



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Manchester United 0-2 Burnley: Clarets shock United at Old Trafford




30 of Chris Wood’s 31 Premier League goals have been scored from inside the boxManchester United were jeered by their own supporters as Burnley registered their first ever Premier League win at Old Trafford.Burnley took the lead just before half-time when Chris Wood spun off Harry Maguire to meet Ben Mee’s knockdown and smash into the top corner from the edge of the six-yard box.Jay Rodriguez doubled the Clarets’ advantage when he played a one-two with Wood before firing into the top corner of David de Gea’s near post with a venomous strike from the left-hand corner of the penalty area. It was the third season in a row Burnley had gone 2-0 up at Old Trafford, but for the first time they hung on for all three points.United, who were without the injured Marcus Rashford, were lacklustre for large periods and barely threatened Nick Pope in the Burnley goal. They were booed off at half-time and full-time and large parts of the ground emptied with five minutes left. Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s side remain six points behind Chelsea and off the top four, while Burnley climb to 13th, seven points clear of the relegation zone. Martial spurns opportunity A lot of pre-match conversation was focused on how United would cope without Rashford, who is sidelined for at least six weeks with a stress fracture of the back.That gave an opportunity to Anthony Martial to stake his claim to be United’s long-term number nine, but the Frenchman looked off the pace throughout and wasted two good first-half opportunities from Aaron Wan-Bissaka’s cross and Nemanja Matic’s throughball. Solskjaer turned to 18-year-old Mason Greenwood at half-time, and the teenager at least showed glimpses of his potential with a brilliant turn past Charlie Taylor followed by a driving run and shot which went just wide. However, the fact Solskjaer is regularly turning to a teenager in a desperate attempt to turn around games is a damning indictment of the quality of his squad, and could prompt United to act in the final nine days of the transfer window.Burnley back to vintage selvesBurnley’s second-half display in their 2-1 win over Champions League-chasing Leicester on Sunday signalled a return to the grit and character that has been the Clarets’ blueprint since they returned to the top flight in 2016.There was more of the same in Manchester on Wednesday as Wood and Rodriguez showed the ruthlessness up front the east Lancashire side have sorely missed at times this season. Behind the front two it was a disciplined and well-organised display, with Mee and James Tarkowski superb at the heart of defence, married with a tenacious midfield display from Jack Cork and Ashley Westwood.Back-to-back wins mean Burnley move level on points with 10th-placed Arsenal, Crystal Palace, Everton and Newcastle – all five teams locked on 30 points.Man of the match – Ben Mee (Burnley)
Alongside assisting Wood’s goal, Mee made the most clearances in the game (nine).’It is not good enough’ – what the managers saidManchester United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, talking to BBC Match of the Day: “There are loads of thoughts going through my mind. At one point it felt like we were creating openings and didn’t take them. Now, it’s one of disappointment. We hold our hands up, it is not good enough.”The players are giving everything, they have done absolutely fantastic so far this season but they know it wasn’t good enough tonight.”The boys they looked mentally tired towards the end, we didn’t find that creativity. We can’t feel sorry for ourselves. When you are at Man Utd you are privileged because you are playing for the best club in the world. Sometimes you go through periods like this and it is a test I am sure they are going to come through.”Burnley manager Sean Dyche, talking to BBC Match of the Day: “I am very pleased with that. We know it’s a tough place to come and it was a good performance from us. We scored two very good goals.”They didn’t find any killer moments, which was very pleasing. Strong, fit and organised will never go out of fashion.”Grim reading for Solskjaer – the statsBurnley ended a run of 15 away league matches without a win against Manchester United, tasting victory for the first time since a 5-2 win in September 1962.Since Ole Gunnar Solskjaer was made permanent manager in March, United have lost more Premier League games (12) than they have won (11).Manchester United suffered consecutive Premier League defeats for only the second time under Solskjaer, losing back-to-back games for the first time since April 2019.Burnley manager Sean Dyche has now beaten 27 of the 29 teams he has faced in the Premier League, failing only against Arsenal (9 games) and Sheffield United (1).Since the start of the 2017-18 season, Burnley striker Chris Wood is one of only 12 players to have scored 30+ Premier League goals (30 in total).Three of the last seven occasions Manchester United have trailed by at least two goals in a home Premier League game have been against Burnley (also December 2017 and January 2019).Chris Wood’s goal in the 39th minute was Burnley’s first goal in the first half of a Premier League game since November, when they scored twice against West Ham.What’s next?Manchester United will travel to the winner of Thursday’s FA Cup third-round replay between Tranmere and Watford on Sunday, 26 January (15:00 GMT) while Burnley host Norwich on Saturday, 25 January (15:00 GMT).



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Leicester thrash West Ham but lose Vardy to injury




Harvey Barnes has scored three goals in his last four games for LeicesterLeicester returned to winning ways against West Ham at King Power Stadium but lost the league’s top scorer Jamie Vardy to injury in the first half.Harvey Barnes scored the opener, poking in from a yard out, before turning provider for Ricardo Pereira on the stroke of half-time.West Ham captain Mark Noble made it 2-1 from the spot before Leicester’s Ayoze Perez did the same.And Perez drilled in a fourth for Leicester with minutes to go. There had been a lengthy stoppage time at the end of the first half as Vardy received treatment for what looked like a hamstring injury.Less than 10 minutes before, Leicester midfielder Nampalys Mendy was substituted for an apparent knee injury and West Ham’s Robert Snodgrass came off at half-time after a knock. One in, two out as injuries mount
Jamie Vardy has started all but two of Leicester’s 24 Premier League games this seasonLeicester were boosted by the return of key midfielder Wilfred Ndidi, who was on the bench just 13 days after having minor knee surgery. Manager Brendan Rodgers had said before kick-off that Ndidi was “there if we need him”.And in the end, Leicester did need him when Mendy went down with an apparent knee injury after 32 minutes. Mendy had filled in for Ndidi in the 2-1 defeat by Burnley on Sunday, as well as playing 70 minutes in the same defensive role in December’s victory over West Ham.But Leicester’s injury concerns got even worse when Premier League top scorer Vardy immediately clutched the back of his left leg after clearing the ball in his own defensive area.Silence spread through the King Power as Vardy – who has scored 17 goals and picked up four assists this season – received treatment on the pitch before attempting to run it off.He lasted barely two minutes when he returned and was eventually substituted for striker Kelechi Iheanacho. Rodgers said after the game Vardy’s injury was “not his hamstring, which is good”.The striker has contributed to 34% of Leicester’s Premier League goals this season and Rodgers added he hoped it would “ease off over the next couple of days”.Job done for Foxes as Hammers struggle
West Ham were second best for most of the game -enjoying just 32% and just two shots on targetLeicester were cruising in the first half and came out the blocks firing.They enjoyed 72% of possession and West Ham only managed 17 passes in the opening 10 minutes.Vardy drew a save from Darren Randolph within minutes – finishing off a slick passing move from Leicester – and there were further chances for Pereira and Mendy before Barnes eventually got the opener on 24 minutes.Pereira slotted the ball across the face of the goal and Barnes could not miss from a yard out, before the two combined again in stoppage time – giving the home fans something to cheer about despite the mood dampening when Vardy trudged off injured.West Ham looked well beaten at the break but they may have sensed the anxiety among the Leicester players and fans because they looked a more threatening side at the start the second half.Noble stepped up confidently to put away the penalty – which was given after minimal contact from Ndidi on Sebastien Haller in the box – and Manuel Lanzini came close to an equaliser when he almost poked in a loose ball from Michail Antonio’s rebounded flick. Leicester rode the simmering pressure and began to settle again – Iheanacho and James Maddison being denied before Perez eventually thumped in the third goal from the spot after Angelo Ogbonna’s clumsy tackle on Iheanacho.The job was done for Leicester, who continued to pepper Randolph’s goal, but Perez doubled his tally with a slick finish from inside the box. The victory leaves Leicester 14 points ahead of fifth-placed Manchester United, while West Ham remain level on points with second-bottom Watford and without a win in three successive league games.Noble’s coolness from the spot – the best of the statsLeicester picked up their eighth home victory in the Premier League this season – this is their most ever during the first 12 home games of a league campaign.This was West Ham manager David Moyes’ 50th Premier League away game against a side starting the day in the top four – the Scotsman has won just one of these 50 games (D15, L34), with that lone victory coming in December 2010 (Manchester City 1-2 Everton).Leicester have now scored 52 goals in the Premier League this season, their most after 24 games of a top-flight campaign since 1930-31 (52).Since the start of October 2019, no team have gained fewer points (11) or lost more games (11) in the Premier League than West Ham. Harvey Barnes has scored in consecutive Premier League games for the first time as a Leicester player, while he’s already netted as many goals in the competition in 2020 (two in three games) as he managed in the whole of 2019 (two in 35 games).Mark Noble has now been directly involved in 79 goals for West Ham in the Premier League (46 goals and 33 assists), the most of any player for the club in the competition’s history, overtaking Paolo Di Canio.Ricardo Pereira has had a direct hand in 13 goals in the Premier League since the start of last season (five goals and eight assists) – the only two defenders with more in this period are Liverpool pair Trent Alexander-Arnold (24) and Andrew Robertson (18).Noble has now scored 27 penalties in the Premier League (out of 31 taken), the fourth-most of any player in the competition’s history, behind Alan Shearer (56), Frank Lampard (43) and Steven Gerrard (32).Man of the match – Harvey Barnes (Leicester)
Harvey Barnes scored one and assisted one, as well as playing four key passes in an impressive display’Success is about the team’Leicester manager Brendan Rodgers, speaking to BBC Sport: “I thought we were very good. We played with that authority in the game and personality that the team has played with all season. Tempo was good, pressed well.”On Jamie Vardy’s injury: “It is not his hamstring which is good. Hopefully over the next couple of days it will ease off and he will be fit. Jamie is a real talisman for the team but if we are going to have success it is about the team.”He hasn’t played for us in a number of games and the team has still played well but of course we want him fit and well. He is such a good player and we hope it is not too serious.”West Ham manager David Moyes, speaking to BBC Sport: “It was a positive that we got something for 10 to 15 minutes but for most of the game Leicester were by far the better team. That hasn’t been the case in all the games, we have been in them or close.”I thought in the second half we at least got the ball forward more. It was good to get Michail Antonio back because he has been good for us. We didn’t have enough players who could make something happen in the final third. We are missing that type of player. “They looked faster to the ball than us. It is never easy but we won’t make excuses. We’ve been good but tonight was probably the worst I have seen us defensively at times.”What’s next?Leicester travel to Brentford for their FA Cup fourth-round tie on Saturday, 25 January (12:45 GMT) before the crucial Carabao Cup semi-final second leg at Aston Villa on Tuesday, 28 January (19:45). Their next Premier League game is at home to Chelsea on Saturday, 1 February (12:30).West Ham host West Bromwich Albion in the FA Cup on Saturday, 25 January (15:00) and return to Premier League action against leaders Liverpool at London Stadium on Wednesday, 29 January (19:45).



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